Wolf Corp. Robotics

W H E R E

I N S P I R A T I O N

C R O S S E S

C O O P E R T I T I O N

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T H E   R O B O T

A W A R D S

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T H A N K   Y O U
C O A C H E S !

Over these past few years in robotics, we’ve learned a lot about STEM and robotics under the guidance of our coaches, Lek and Scott. They began a robotics club ever since our elementary school years, teaching young children and developing their interest in science and technology. We have learned many aspects of FIRST such as core values. Coach Lek and Scott expanded our knowledge of robotics by dedicating hours of their time to host practices and outreaches to spread the goal of FIRST. Transitioning into FTC was also a great leap forward. We learned about the different tools, pieces, and programming languages needed to power a more advanced robot. This was helpful because we adjusted to a level of FIRST that was more related to the real world of robotics and machines. Throughout these years, thank you, coaches, for teaching us about FIRST!

O U R   M I S S I O N

We are a pack of wolves who love to have fun and work together to become a good role model. We aim to inspire other children to work as a team and get involved in Robotics and STEM Education. This year is our 5th year together as Wolf Corp. We participated in FLL for 4 years, and this our second year in FTC. Our team gained many life skills by learning FIRST Core Values. All of our members are 9th graders attending Walnut High School in Walnut, California.

P R O G R A M M I N G

Programming serves as a key part of the FTC competition, making our robot move based on the controller and also sensors. Our four programmers help develop Java code for Autonomous and TeleOp, bringing us up on top. We practice together, discussing issues and testing prototypes of our programs. In the end, we aim to build a great program to perform our best.

Joshua Eric Daniel Programming
Gordon Glory Kawin Kevin Building

B U I L D I N G

Without a robot, we would never win a competition. Where other category members can’t fill in, we have Building members swoop in to build the robot. Through all the work and dedication, the 5 main builders have constructed the base, scoring mechanism, intake system, protection safeties, and wiring setups. Just to name a few, they use power tools, brackets, channels, zip ties, a variety of nuts and bolts, hammers, and plexiglass to construct the robot.

B U S I N E S S

Although it may not seem like it, Business members are vital to having a functional team. Business controls our external relationships with businesses, experts and outreach events, while also doing documentation and scouting for competition. They find places to spread the world of STEM, attract sponsors to support our team, invite experts over to give us tips, manage the Engineering Notebook, and get information about who could benefit us as an Alliance. Business members always try to keep track of our programming and building progress as well, so we can accurately recollect of what we have done. They fill the Engineering Notebook with great details about our team’s accomplishments and hope to inspire kids to do as great.

Nathan Jason Conor Sarah Chandrark Icon by Mohit Gandhi

C O N N E C T I N G   W I T H   O T H E R S

As Wolf Corp., our goal is to inspire other kids to work as a team and get involved in STEM education. The robot isn’t the only part of the competition, and we never aim to just get first place in the competition. Truly impacting the community and people around us to be excited about robotics and STEM is what we aspire to do. Instead of just focusing on our team, we aim to influence brilliant teenagers and kids to improve the world.

O U R   T E A M   &   C O M P A N Y

References

T H E   G A M E

Competition

Competition

In our league, FTC, Robot Ruckus is this year’s event. Take a look at this video to explain it:

Our Autonomous

Our Autonomous

For our Autonomous, our goal is to complete all four objectives and possibly even more. We can score a total of 80 points by first unlatching, sampling, then placing our marker, and finally parking (will be explained more in “The Structure” section). We try to program our autonomous to not run into another’s robot, so their and our robot can execute well. If our Alliance can’t sample, we also have a program that fits the time given to sample both. Doing this gives us another 25 points, equivalent to 5 minerals scored in the lander. Autonomous is key to winning the match, so we have our programs pass a 90% accuracy test.

Our Tele-Op

Our Tele-Op

During Tele-Op, we have our two drivers and driver coach try to score as many points as possible. We have our robot take minerals from the crater, while also staying outside of the crater. It then goes up into the lander, being dropped from above (will be explained more in “The Structure” section). We can take either mineral and average about 7 minerals. We always aim for the lander, for the extra 3 points per mineral leverage. This way, we can score about 35 points during Tele-Op. This can mean the difference between a good team and a great team.

Our End Game

Our End Game

When End Game comes around, we try to secure as many points as we can. We know that our robot must take time to latch back, but we also want to get the last couple we already have into the lander. Latching back is worth 50 points, a large portion of the score, so we always pay special attention and give extra time for it. Usually, we give about 15 seconds to get off the ground, so we don’t risk the loss. In large part, End Game is a race against time.

I T S   B R A I N S

Android Studio

Android Studio

The programmers use the Android Studio IDE to edit, run, and debug code for our robot. It’s IDE has text completion and great indicators, creating a convenient workplace. With a press of a button, Studio transfers the code to the phone application, keeping everything simple. Android Studio is oriented for applications, so our code can be easily configured by the built-in settings. The debugger is also a great help because we can navigate to the line of failure with a simple link. Android Studio's tools help us program the robot with ease.

DogeCV

DogeCV

DogeCV is a computer vision library that we use mainly to detect gold for Autonomous by finding the object and its color. Developed by FTC teams 7195, 12897, and 8565, it’s based off EnderCV, another library that works with color detection but less advanced. EnderCV, built by Github user @guineawheek, is also built off a library, OpenCV. OpenCV is the library with all the advanced algorithms to detect various things through computer vision. All of this contribution from our great community helps our robot to sample in Autonomous.

Autonomous Programming

Autonomous Programming

Autonomous is run by two programs and a backup, depending on our side, to score maximum points during the 30 second period. Both programs start off with setting the power of the hanging mechanism to -1 to move down for 6 inches. During unhanging, our camera turns on to detect gold with the DogeCV library. It detects gold, and sidesteps to it and pushes it forward, off the initial point. It then turns to place marker and finally parks. The backup has the ability to sample two, just in case our Alliance isn’t able to. We have calculated the proportions just right, so our scale is exactly 1:1. We also have methods to move, instead of tediously coding it every time. It is very simple, with something just like turnLeft(45). Our Autonomous programs get the job done with an elegant method.

Code Snippets

Code Snippets

N O N - M O V I N G
P A R T S

O U R   R O B O T
S T R U C T U R E

M O V I N G   P A R T S

A W A R D S

First Place Meet 1, 2, 3

Winning Alliance Captain Interleague

Interleague Think Award

Southern California Regionals - Motivate Award

M o r e   A w a r d s !

C O N T A C T   U S !

(626)-667-4559
[email protected]
Illustration credit: Icons8


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